How To Create Multi-Frame Run Photos

I’ve been creating running photos like this for a while now and recently people have been asking how it is done.

It started off with a fascination with floating photos, where both feet are off the ground. I expanded this to pull multiple frames from the same video and stitch them together to create images like above.

The complete process is carried out on an iPhone using apps Snapseed and Over. These apps are free and are available for both iOS and Android.

The Process

When I first started posting floating shots, the technique behind that was to take some slow-motion video (to provide the most usable frames) and screenshot the frame I needed.

This process builds upon that. You start with some slow-motion video, ensuring the background does not move. Then screenshot a number of non-overlapping frames from the video.

Before merging begins, you may want to enhance the individual frames in your favorite mobile photo editor. I use Snapseed for this task.

If you decide to crop, ensure each frame is cropped identically. I recommend leaving cropping and any straightening until after the merge stage.

To merge the frames I use Over, as it supports layers in a project. I load in the first image, and then immediately load the second image, ensuring it is sized and positioned correctly.

For some reason, Over adds subsequent images a little smaller than original size. To fix this, use the resize tool to increase to 125%. Be careful, not to move the photo.

Once it’s positioned correctly, use the mask tool to remove just enough of the 2nd photo so you can see yourself underneath. If you use the feathered mask tool, it will blend a lot better.

If you are a bit too aggressive with the mask tool, Over has a reverse mask tool to allow you to put pieces back. You can also zoom in to work on more intricate areas.

Continue the process of adding images for as many frames that you captured. Once all layers have been merged, export the image from Over.

Once exported, I usually bring it back into Snapseed to straighten and crop. It is now ready to post on your socials! I would love to see your creations, so please tag me if possible!

Here’s a video of the process I made while processing one of these images.

How to set up Interval Training on your Garmin

I’ve had my Garmin Forerunner 230 for almost 2 years now, and only recently decided to give Interval Training a go. I knew the watch had an Interval Training function, but I’d never used it.

For those unfamiliar with the term, “Interval Training” is a exercise routine that is made up of sections of intense effort, separated by short periods of rest (or recovery). The “recipe” is entirely up to you (or whatever your training plan dictates).

The idea behind Interval Training is to increase your running speed — in fact, some people refer to it as “Speed Training”, but it also helps to improve muscular endurance.

Plans can use either distance (usually meters) or time — or a mixture of both. A fairly common plan looks something like the following:

  • 1-2 mile warm-up run
  • 400 meters x6 / 1 minute rest
  • 1-2 mile cool-down

To follow this, you’d start with a short easy warm-up, run hard for 400 meters, followed by a 1 minutes recovery period. Repeat 6 times before finally cooling down with another easy run.

400 meters (approximately 1/4 mile) happens to be the standard length of a running track. This means you can leave a supply of water and/fuel by the side of the track to use during your training session.

With Garmin, you can set-up Intervals via the Garmin Connect website, or directly on your watch (see images below). The watch then prompts you when to run and when to rest based on the settings you select.

 

If you don’t have a watch with this functionality, you can use an app on your phone. The Nike+ app allows you to set up Intervals — check out the “Speed Run” option. The Runkeeper app also has a custom workout option that will support Intervals.

Strava at this time does not support Intervals. I sync my runs with Strava and noticed that it doesn’t even support the splits properly, so I have to refer to Garmin Connect to see my splits for Interval sessions.

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Is Interval Training a regular part of your training schedule? What benefits have you seen from it?